Plants Add Lasting Beauty and Soothe Grief

Black Eyed Susan

A brilliant harbinger of summer with a long lasting biannual bloom.

Many years ago word came that a dear friend had tragically died in Utah, over a thousand miles from our Iowa home.  With deep feelings of grief of the loss of a vibrant young woman I (Rich) felt the need to “do something for her.”

We were in the process of restoring prairie to a bare patch of ground on recently purchased piece of land at the Indian Creek Nature Center.  A bag of prairie wildflowers perched against my office wall caught my eye.  I grabbed the bag, walked to the meadow and scattered the seeds in the woman’s honor.

The seeds thrived.  Now, a dozen years later they grace the prairie with color and restore memories of my friend. We shared this story with our friend’s husband who was moved. So, we decided to share our way of honoring and memorializing ones dear to us.

Planting flowers, shrubs, and trees in a yard or park is an outstanding way to reduce grief, maintain memories, honor someone, and make our world healthier and more vibrant.

Royal Catch Fly

What a stunner!

Swallow Tail On Purple Cone

Sipping nectar

Purple Coneflowers

Purple Coneflowers add color to a prairie.

Prairie Ballerina

Periodically readers send lovely essays and observations of their Wondrous Yards.  Below is a poetic piece by Katrina Garner.

“One of the benefits of creating and maintaining burn barriers around prairie areas is that the resulting “pathways” provide the perfect opportunity to observe the prairies from all sides.  Every morning I head out with our Lab Schatzie for our long daily walk around the property, letting Schatzie choose our route.  Sometimes she startles a deer, and sometimes a turkey blasts out of the grasses right in front of us.  Schatzie holds on to the hope that one day she’ll actually catch one of the hundreds of rabbits who manage to stay just out of her reach.  Always there’s a chorus of bird songs, blending together like a pastoral symphony, to remind me to focus on nature’s sounds.

Prairie Ballerina

Capturing the essence of prairie blooms.

“I have my phone handy in case I see the perfect view for a future landscape painting.  One day this past week we were ending the walk along the path between our first prairie planting and the pollinator strip next to it.  The house was above us beyond the prairie.  Our farm is named “Himmelhof,” a phrase coined by a friend of ours as an approximate Austrian translation for “House in the Heavens.”  Seen from many points on the property, the house does seem to “float” above the prairie, and I’m particularly fond of those views of the house.  At this point in our walk, the coneflowers and Black-eyed Susans were plentiful and at their peak, so I took out my phone and framed my photo to capture the “floating house” with colorful flowers in the foreground.

“A few days later, going through the recent photos on a larger computer screen, I was startled to see what looked like a ballerina with her arms raised to the heavens and her face turned towards the sun.  If I wished to be pragmatic, I would acknowledge the fact that “she” was a cup-plant (Silphium perfoliatum) just masquerading as a fairy ballerina.  However, the romantic in me chooses to see my prairie ballerina fairy as a joyful, whimsical reminder that I should always keep my mind and heart open to the beauty of the nature around me.

Katrina Garner, July, 2016″

Keep sharing about your lovely spaces, folks!  Thanks, Katrina.