Iowa normally enjoys about an inch of rain a week during the growing season. Not this year. We haven’t had rain for a month and none is in sight. Droughts have their benefits. Most obvious is the dearth of mosquitoes and gnats that thrive during wet years. Less known is what dry spells teach us about plants.

Brown grass. Green plants

Native plants tend to resist drought better.

As we walked across a large brown lawn in a cemetery, we noticed green healthy plants poking through dead looking Kentucky bluegrass. They were mostly native species well adapted to a month of heat and dryness.

 

 

 

Here’s what the brown lawn taught us:

  • Many people spend money and countless hours attempting to create a perfect weed-free green lawn composed of bluegrass and fescue. These shallow-rooted European species are poorly adapted to American dry spells.
  • Prairie and other native plants send roots down as far as 15 feet to tap deep moisture that lets them stay green and healthy through droughts.
  • Lawns established on rich soil with spongy organic matter stay green much longer than those planted in the poor, compacted soil of housing developments.
  • Areas fortunate enough to enjoy some shade stay green longer than counterparts in the sun all day.

Here are tips for anyone wanting a green
yard during late summer’s dryness:

  • Replace the lawn with deep-rooted native species.
  • If a cropped lawn is important don’t water but:
    Build Topsoil:   Gradually add compost over the grass. Maybe an inch a year.
    Compost fertilizes plants and absorbs and stores rain.

Mow high and infrequently:  Forget the “once-a-week” contract. Buzzing off the grass stresses it
and doesn’t allow roots to penetrate deeply.

Promote diversity:   A bluegrass monoculture invites problems.  Diversity of plant species ensures
that some will thrive no matter what the weather   If it’s green when nearby grass is brown,
enjoy its health.

Avoid herbicides:  Chemicals tend to kill drought-resistant native plants.

Fortunately, even exotic lawn grasses green up as soon as cooler damp fall weather arrives, but at Winding Pathways we simply allow the brown grass to rest and enjoy our green native plants that have evolved to thrive during dry spells.

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